In a Different Life

When I was pregnant with my first child, I imagined all the experiences I would have with my son. As I’m sure all expectant mothers do. Not just the first few weeks and months, but also the years ahead.

Breastfeeding, cuddles, learning to walk and ride a bike.

Trips to the park, standing on the sidelines watching him play football or rugby, and waving him off for his first day at Secondary School.

Little did I know that my life with a first born child would be so different.

Different.

Not worse, in fact sometimes better – And certainly much more interesting and fulfilling in ways only a Special Needs Parent could possibly imagine.

Tube feeding, cuddles with wires everywhere frightened you would knock something that was keeping your baby alive. Bringing your baby home for first time, aged 6 months.

Lennon’s first day at school.

Learning to walk in a frame aged 5, fundraising for an adapted wheelchair bike.

Spending endless days, weeks, months inside a tiny hospital room.

Today, in the life I imagined myself leading this time 12 years ago, Lennon would of started Secondary School. I would be straightening a wonky tie, taming messy hair, shining a pair of smart black shoes and watching an 11 year old out of the front door.

That day was never meant be.

Instead, I would of been administering a ton of medications, changing dressing, emptying stoma bags and packing medical equipment and supplies ready for the day ahead. I would of smothered my gorgeous boy with kisses and cuddles before pushing him out of the front door in his wheelchair and onto the school bus.

Trying to get a photo of them all together always took many attempts….
Finally!

But I am not doing that either.

Instead I am waving off only 2 of my 3 children for their first day of the school year. Florence into year 1 and Isla into year 6.

If you told me I could have Lennon back, even for the shortest time, and I could choose between the Son I imagined all those years ago, or the Lennon we were given, I would never choose the life that I imagined and dreamt of.

I would always choose the Lennon I know and love and our extraordinary life.

Lennon having fun at school, his favourite place.

There will be many Special Needs Parents sending their children off to school this morning wishing that they were on their way to a mainstream secondary school.

I’m sat here wishing my son was alive and that I was standing at my door waving him off on the school bus to his severe learning disability school, watching his beaming smile and flapping arms as the bus turns the corner at the bottom of my road.

The last ‘First day of school’ photo of all of my children x

Quality not Quantity – Life’s Short.

By the time Lennon turned 2 years old, he had spent the majority of his life in hospital – predominantly in Intensive Care. The short amounts of time we did get to spend at home were fraught with anxiety and worry.

Lennon was oxygen dependent, needed regular suction and was fed into a jejunostomy (a surgical feeding tube placed into his small bowel). His stomach contents drained out into a bag and we needed to calculate these fluid losses in order to replace the lost volumes as Lennon had stage 3 kidney failure.

He required multiple medications throughout the day and night including hormone injections.

He regularly stopped breathing and on occasion, needed me to resuscitate him at home.

Lennon had also been diagnosed as being deaf blind.

Lennon and Isla in Rainforest ward, Great Ormond Street Hospital.

Caring for Lennon was an immense responsibility and at times I felt completely out of my depth – my head bopping continuously above and below the surface of stormy waters.

When he stopped breathing, I found my own breath stuck heavy in my chest.

The pressure was enormous and all consuming.

I love Lennon and I would do anything for him, absolutely anything – nothing was too much.

I gave up my life to look after Lennon and keep him alive. I quit my much loved career, hardly saw my friends and rarely left the house or Lennon’s hospital bed side.

Lennon was admitted to Intensive Care for the fifth time when he 2 years and 1 month old.

He was very poorly. He had a central line infection and bronchiolitis. His bowel had failed on Christmas Eve, just 2 weeks prior, and he was surviving on intravenous nutrition.

His existing diagnoses of renal failure and pan hypopituitarism made providing life support for Lennon complicated. The outlook was bleak and the doctors had asked Lennon’s father, Ian, and I to consider turning off Lennon’s support and ending his difficult and problematic life.

Lennon’s fifth time in Pediatric Intensive Care, Aged 2.

We were both horrified at the very thought of life without our little soldier. I wanted so much more for him. I yearned for him to experience life – joy, excitement and happiness. And I wanted others to experience the elation that came along with Lennon’s achievements, and for him to leave a footprint on the lives of other, just as he had on our lives.

Of course, we said No – Lennon would be one to decide when he no longer had the energy to survive.

And in the moment the word No left my mouth, I made a vow to Lennon, and myself, that his life would be as rich and fulfilled as possible.

Lennon slowly improved and eventually came home – still with a complex and time consuming medical routine. It was then that we were referred to Palliative Care at our nearest children’s hospice, Keech hospice in Luton. Keech’s holistic approach enabled us to care for Lennon at home and keep him there.

I spent the next 8 years researching, planning and booking the most amazing experiences for Lennon, and memories for our family. Yes, he was life limited, in a wheelchair, was deaf blind and had a profound and multiple learning disabilities – but why should that be a reason to stop someone from experiencing a full rainbow of life? Why should he miss out?

We took Lennon swimming at Keech Hospice as much as we possibly could – this was always a mammoth task. Changing Lennon’s dressings, keeping an eye on his dropping blood sugars, and keeping him warm was difficult but his excitement and enthusiasm to be in the water made all the stress of the situation melt away.

Lennon loved to swim, he would of swam everyday if he could of.

We went Ice skating as a family every year on Lennon’s Birthday in December, it became a family tradition. Lennon loved ice skating and the faster the better. One year Ian went so fast he managed to fall over and tip Lennon’s wheelchair backwards into the ice – I was totally horrified and I’m sure my heart missed a beat. Lennon on the other hand, thought the whole experience was hilarious and seemed to be asking Ian to repeat the whole scenario!

Birthday ice skating.

Disney on Ice became a twice yearly event. When it came to Lennon, you couldn’t go wrong with ice skating and Disney together in one venue – two of his most favorite things!

We fundraised and purchased a walking frame and a special bike.

Lennon spent hours toddling around in his walking frame when he was well, and in the summer, we used to stand his walking frame in a paddling pool and he would splash away with such delight.

Playing in the paddling pool.

The bike was incredible – it was a life changer for Lennon. He was a real thrill seeker and was enraptured by speed. Ian would take him for long bike rides, speeding through long, windy country lanes. Lennon flapping his arms and screaming with delight!

Lennon picking Isla up from school on his bike.

I found a company who provided ski lessons to people with a disability. This was a little trickier and took a lot of planning. Lennon’s pan hypopituitarism meant his body disagreed with cold temperatures. But we found ways to work around that. Skiing became a favorite activity for Lennon – the buzz of sweeping down the slopes enraptured him. His face exuded excitement and happiness.

We also took him down the mini slope in a donut ring!

Neither Ian nor I have ever skied, yet our disabled son has.

My little thrill seeker. Lennon loved skiing – the faster the better!

We desperately wanted to take Lennon to Euro Disney – we knew he would love it! But the professionals had forbidden us to leave the country without trained medical support.

Year after year we applied to The Caudwell Children’s yearly trip to Disney Land, Florida – ‘Destination Dreams’. Every year they take 25 children and their families plus a team of 12 doctors and nurses. It solved our problem of needing to travel with medical support. And in 2015 we were selected!

Destination Dreams was the trip of a lifetime. It took months of planning and we travelled with almost 50kg of medical supplies, a file jam packed with medical notes, letters from doctors and emergency plans. But it was oh so worth it!

We stayed in Give Kids the World and visited the parks. I was shocked that so many of the rides had adapted carts for wheelchair users and ecstatic that for one week Lennon did not have to be excluded from anything. My little thrill seeker absolutely loved the rides! The fast and higher, the more he delighted he was. He adored the characters and was mesmerized when we Mickey Mouse in Magic Kingdom. I think the Electric Parade at Magic Kingdom was his highlight. His permanent beaming face on that trip will remain imprinted in my memory forever.

Meeting Princess Elsa. Magic Kingdom, Florida.

Lennon sadly died on 3rd August 2017, in the same Intensive Care Unit that had asked us to turn off his life support eight and a half years earlier. It was Lennon’s time – his exhausted little body had run out of fight. We had been luck enough to of been under palliative care for over 8 years, and therefore we had talked about the final stages of Lennon’s life many times. Palliative care gave us the knowledge to enable us to make educated decisions over time and not have to make quick decisions during the hardest time of our lives. We had always wanted Lennon to die at Keech Hospice, but unfortunately it wasn’t meant to be. The team at Addenbrookes and the lovely staff at Keech worked hard planning, and Lennon made his final journey to the hospice less than 12 hours after he died. He stayed there until his funeral.

We will be eternally grateful for those extra eight and a half years. Eight and half years packed full of joy, excitement and happiness.

Horse riding with school.

And yes, Lennon did make an immeasurable impact on the lives of everyone he came into contact with. He is remembered by many as ‘The boy with the Midas touch’.

Lennon’s fun packed life proves that palliative care is not about giving up, there are always ways to live your life – in the capacity and time that you have – to the maximum.

Playing football with Daddy.

Quality, not Quantity.

December 3rd, 4 months.

On the 3rd of December it will be 4 months since Lennon died.

17 weeks since I last saw his ocean blue eyes wide open.

121 days since his little body grew too tired to carry on fighting.

My gorgeous boy.

I want to be able to tell you that the pain has lessened slightly, but it hasn’t.

It’s still there.

It smacks me in the chest when I awake every morning. It still hurts, but the pain is becoming familiar.

Some days I feel like I’m drowning in pain, my body feels heavy and my head foggy.

Some days I feel ok.

There are rare days when I feel good. Not happy, good – I can’t imagine feeling real, true happiness ever again.

Our home is quiet and bare.

No nurses or carers in and out at all times of the day.

No school bus.

No deliveries.

No mad drugs runs to various collection points.

And the phone barely rings anymore.

They came and took away Lennon’s bed. The magnitude of this was immense – not only is there now a gapping space in Lennon’s room where his bed stood, but there is also the cold fact that now Lennon has nowhere to sleep in our home. He is definitely not coming back.

Florence cried for days. She was always very aware of the fact Lennon could only sleep in his bed. Now his bed is gone, and that means he cant sleep here anymore – he is never coming home.

I gave away Lennon’s bike to another family – a little boy similar to Lennon. I hope him and his family experience as much joy from it as Lennon did.

His walking frame, medical ancillaries and special milk feed were shipped to a children’s home in Zimbabwe.

Escaping from respite! 

The sympathy cards came down.

I found the empty spaces in our home unbearable. I brought a coffee table for our living room to fill the gap where Lennon sat in his wheelchair to watch television.

Lennon’s clothes are still in his drawers, untouched. His drawers are still in his bedroom. It is still Lennon’s bedroom – It will always be his bedroom.

Ian and I went back to Great Ormond St to see Lennon’s surgeon, gastroenterologist and his complex care nurse. To say goodbye and to thank them for playing such a significant part in the 10 years of Lennon’s life.

But also to settle our minds – would the outcome of been different if Lennon had of been transferred to GOS instead of Addenbrookes? Would Lennon of had a better chance of surviving if he had of got to theatre any quicker? Would the outcome of been different if it was Lennon’s surgeon who performed that last chance surgery? – The surgeon who often joked he knew Lennon’s inside better than his outside.

The ‘what if’s’ in my head had gained momentum as the weeks passed – Lennon’s surgeon thwarted them in their tracks.

Lennon’s heart had stopped beating less than 12 hours after he became unwell – the sepsis had already taken over his little body.

Lennon’s surgeon had read the theatre notes from Addenbrookes – the surgeon had written that they were astounded Lennon was still alive considering the entanglement the saw in his small bowel. It was apparent that It didn’t matter who performed the surgery or when he got to theatre – Lennon’s small bowel was beyond saving.

Ian and I left in tears.

We walked around the City for hours. Talking, crying and remembering. I drank too much.

It was heartbreaking to go back and have to hear what we did. But I needed to hear it from the man who knew my little soldiers bowel better than anyone. The ‘what if’s’ have vacated my head.

As well as campaigning to save Lennon’s beloved respite centre, I have been doing small amounts of work here and there. I am enjoying it, and very slowly I’m beginning to find myself again. Build myself a new life. It’s hard – I loved my old life, I enjoyed being a part of the special club I was in. I loved caring for Lennon and I made it my purpose in life to make sure he best quality of life possible. Now I’ve been kicked out and pushed into a new club – The Bereaved Mum club – A club I didn’t chose or want, but I suddenly ended up in.

One thing I do know is that Lennon put me on a path. A very different path from where my life was heading. He took me on a journey, gave me an experience that not many people get from life. I need to carry on down that same path and use the knowledge and expertise that Lennon taught me to help change the system for other families.

December the 3rd – 4 months since Lennon died.

My birthday.

Mummy and Lennon x

Back to school, back to reality

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Back to School 2016 – Lennon year 5, Isla year 4, Florence morning preschool.

Little did I know this would be the last back to school photo of all my children together.

I had been dreading this week.

I wanted to be excited for my girls – Isla started middle school and Florence had her first day at school. But instead, I was overcome with sadness.

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Back to school 2017. Isla year 5 starting at middle school, Florence starting in reception.

Lennon would of gone back to school on the same day as the girls (Tuesday) in year 6, still in his PMLD class.

He loved school. I always looked forward to putting his uniform on him for the first day back – his excitement when he realised he was going back to school after 6 weeks away was incredible!

He always looked his best after the summer holidays – the only time his skin slightly coloured, and his hair sun kissed blonde.

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Back to School 2012 – Isla reception, Lennon year 1.

I miss that hair.

I fought with myself all day. Sobbing for what I have lost, what I should have, what I want. Heartbroken for the missing face that should of been smiling back at me through the camera lens. But at the same time feeling proud of my girls. That they had gotten through the awfulness of the last month, and were both excited to start at new schools. I tried to push the sadness to the back on my mind and concentrate on feeling happy – but no matter how hard I tried, the tears wouldn’t stop.

I imagined how sad it would be at school without him. The empty space in his class where he sat. His peg bare, and the silence left without him quacking and clicking.

The reality of life moving on hit me.

Lennon’s car was towed away on Thursday. We obviously knew this would happen, but we were rushed into the whole process as the DVLA had removed the vehicle tax after being informed of Lennon’s death.

We had to quickly purchase a new car.

I couldn’t drive Lennon’s car, but I still sat in it. Remembering when it first arrived (it was our first wheelchair accessible vehicle) and Lennon’s beaming face sitting in the back, waving at everyone. We nicknamed him ‘The Pope’ when we took him out in it! I couldn’t bring myself to empty out all his emergency medical equipment from the various cubby holes. And I didn’t think I’d be that upset about it going until it was on the back of the pick up truck, and I spotted the little stick family stuck on the back window.

Our family. Our family of five.

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Our mobility car being taken away.

Letters carry on arriving informing us of our benefits stopping, benefits that we had relied on. Invoices charging us for over payments, backdated to the exact date Lennon died. Invoices that I cannot pay, because I now have no money to pay them. All the money we had has been spent on a car so that I can get Isla to school.

I applied for job seekers allowance, wanting to buy myself a little extra time to grieve before returning to some form of work. Only to be told that because I hadn’t ‘worked’ in 10 years I was ineligible. Despite the fact that in those 10 years, I had worked harder and for many more hours than the average person. The fact that I had saved the government and the NHS hundreds of thousands of pounds by providing my son with hourly complex medical care counts for nothing.

It feels like another big kick in the gut – for 10 years you gave up your life, your career, to look after your beloved son. You saved the tax payer hundreds of thousands of pounds. You thought you were doing the right thing. You put everything you had into giving your child the most fulfilled life he could possibly have.

Your child dies. You are lost. Your whole life purpose has vanished. You want to disappear with it. You want life to stop whilst you try to comprehend what has happened to you.

You are told to man up – move on. Get a job. Pay the bills. Provide for your remaining family. Leaving the last 10 years a memory.

So this weekend I have the task of putting my CV together, and trying to find a job.

The one thing I have decided on, is that I won’t be going back to the career I had before Lennon. It’s not me anymore.

I want to make a difference. I want to be one of those people that made a difference to Lennon’s life.

I have enjoyed the work I have been doing to try to Save Nascot Lawn from being closed, and ideally I would like a job doing similar. Unfortunately the only qualifications I have in this are my life experiences.

I don’t want to forget the last 10 years and become a different person – I want to remain who I am, Lennon’s Mummy. And to use all my experiences, everything I have learnt and done over Lennon’s life to shape the person who I become in future.

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Lennon and Mummy x

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