Who is a Young Carer?

I had never thought of my daughters, Isla age 9 and Florence age 5, as being young carers and I had never identified them to Carers in Herts (our local charity supporting carers), although their school did know about Lennon and that their home life was not ‘normal’.

It had taken me a long time to realise that I was a Carer myself. In my eyes we were a just ordinary family with an extraordinary member!

What is a young carer?

I thought you could only be a young carer if you were a child caring for their parent.

I was wrong.

The Carers Trust defines a young carer as ‘someone under 18 who helps look after someone in their family, or a friend, who is ill, disabled or misuses drugs or alcohol’.

My girls helped me look after Lennon, their brother.

‘A young carer might help out with practical tasks, such as housework or preparing meals. They may provide help with personal care such as getting washed and dressed. They might help out with looking after their siblings’.

Isla and Florence helped to get Lennon washed and dressed, they made their own breakfast in the morning. Isla would help make Florence’s packed lunch and help her to get dressed for school.

How did I not realise that my daughters were young carers?!

Maybe because they were born into their life, and they had never known any different.

They were born into their caring role.

After Lennon died I met Jodie Deards, the Carers Lead for East and North Herts NHS trust at Lister Hospital and winner of the ‘Commitment to Carers’ award at the RCNi Nurse Awards 2017.

Since meeting Jodie I have become much more aware of what defines a young carer and the impact caring has on their lives whilst they are growing up.

At a time when they should be out having fun with their friends, doing homework and worrying about what clothes they should wear, young carers are busy helping out with cooking, cleaning and laundry, and providing both emotional support and physical care.

The facts shocked me –

There are roughly 700,000 young carers in the UK – that equates to 1 in every 12 secondary school age children.

And 1 in every 12 of those young carers is likely to be caring for more than 15 hours every week.

The Family Action report ‘Be Bothered’ written in 2012 and based on young carers and their education, found that most young carers are not known to be caring by school staff – Being a young carer can be a hidden cause of poor attendance, underachievement and bullying, and many young carers drop out of school or achieve no qualifications.

This in turn will have a huge impact on the rest of their lives.

Young Carers have dreams, ambitions and aspirations for the future just like every other young person and we should be making sure that they get the support and help that they deserve to achieve those dreams, ambitions and aspirations.

If you think you are a Young Carer or you know someone who might be, please visit The Carers Trust and find your local Young Carers support services – https://carers.org/search/network-partners

Jodie’s 5 top tips for Young Carers

1. Let someone know you have a caring role, such as your teacher.

2. Ask for help – nobody can cope alone.

3. Get a break and make time for yourself.

4. When you get tired or angry, step away and take a few minutes to listen to your favourite music.

5. You don’t need to do it alone – contact Young Carers in your county for support. If you are in Hertfordshire please contact Carers in Herts. http://www.carersinherts.org.uk/how-we-can-help/young-carers

For further information regarding Young Carers please visit –

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/social-care-and-support/young-carers-rights/?

https://carers.org/about-us/about-young-carers

2 thoughts on “Who is a Young Carer?

  1. Nikki, you are an inspiration. You have continued to chose to raise awareness for others so they can get that support so they can continue to care. All the young carers I’ve spoken to wouldn’t change their lives but we should work to make it easier.

    Liked by 1 person

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